The Cost of Hiring a New Employee

Rosa Smith-Montanaro

by Rosa Smith-Montanaro, Placement Specialist

Job seekers often feel like they have to be Superman or Wonder Woman to be considered for a job. In part, this statement is true; employers are looking for a long list of qualifications. It can be overwhelming and discouraging when you are trying so hard to find work yet not receiving job offers. So how can you make an impact that will stick with a hiring manager long after you leave the interview?

Maybe it is time to approach the employer with a new perspective. Put yourself in their shoes and view the job seeker as an investment for their organization. There is a price tag associated with hiring a new employee: additional expenses to train them and bring them up to speed with best practices within their industry. There is also an ongoing cost to supervising new employees. We haven’t even discussed how much money it costs to provide holiday pay, time off, 401K, benefits, etc.

From the employers’ perspective you are an expense for months before you become an asset to the organization. The goal is to produce enough value to the company so that you will contribute to its profitability. A good hiring manager keeps this in mind while interviewing. The owner of the company never gets it out of their minds long after an employee is hired.

It is not an easy decision to hire new staff, so there must be a problem that needs to be solved to push the need to bring someone on board. Think of how you can solve the problem your prospective employer has. Put yourself in their place before the interview. Talk from the perspective of contributing to the company’s ability to thrive and succeed.  Show them that you are going to be a good return on their investment.

This may seem like a completely different view point, but if what you have been doing isn’t working, why not give it a try?

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Rosa Smith-Montanaro is a Placement Specialist for RochesterWorks!. She works with businesses on behalf of the Summer Youth Employment Program and Year Round Youth Employment Services. Rosa also serves as the Wellness Coordinator, reviewing and implementing initiatives that will contribute to creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle for all employees. Rosa has been at RochesterWorks! for four years and has worked directly with customers as a Career Services Advisor and a Workshop Specialist in addition to working with businesses as a Business Services Representative.

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One thought on “The Cost of Hiring a New Employee

  1. Thanks Rosa! This a very good point about the cost and value to an organization of finding good talent.

    Thought I would add for our job seekers that measuring “cost-per-hire” is a very hot topic with employers right now. Just search “cost-per-hire” on the Society for Human Resource Management (www.shrm.org) website to see all the buzz.
    This cost is probably at least $2,000 per hire before the cost of bringing someone on-board, training them, etc…
    This means that, as employers become more attentive to these costs, it is more important for job seekers to know and market their value to a prospective employer.

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